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Senior Electrical Design Engineer Job In Preston, Lancashire

Published 2021-12-16
Expires 2022-01-16
ID #795987690
50000 £
Senior Electrical Design Engineer Job In Preston, Lancashire
United Kingdom, Lancashire, Preston,
Published December 16, 2021

Job details:

Job type: Full time
Contract type: Permanent
Salary type: Per annum
Occupation: Senior electrical design engineer
Min. Salary: 40000.00


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Description

Senior electrical design engineer

* Independent building services consultancy

* Very strong client base with varied workload across different sectors

* Clients are often end users in Healthcare, manufacturing and aerospace

* Strong BIM capability

Our client is a well known local consultant who has been operating in the region for the last 15 years.

They are looking for a senior electrical engineer who is self-sufficient, can run projects from start to finish and can help out the management team.

Their workload is extremely varied often with end user clients including the NHS, a furniture retailer, local football clubs and colleges amongst others.

In relation to duties you would enjoy a really mixed bag. They are involved in survey work, detailed design, clerk of works, employers agent, feasibility studies, modelling and design management.

Why apply?

Excellent working environment

Very strong local client base

Very low staff turnover

Flat management structure

Very strong team of ten technical staff

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Contact employer

    50000 £ / Per annum

    Employer's info

    Tozer Associates
    Registered on October 7, 2017

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    Technology ("science of craft", from Greek τέχνη, techne, "art, skill, cunning of hand"; and -λογία, -logia) is the collection of techniques, skills, methods, and processes used in the production of goods or services or in the accomplishment of objectives, such as scientific investigation. Technology can be the knowledge of techniques, processes, and the like, or it can be embedded in machines to allow for operation without detailed knowledge of their workings. The simplest form of technology is the development and use of basic tools. The prehistoric discovery of how to control fire and the later Neolithic Revolution increased the available sources of food, and the invention of the wheel helped humans to travel in and control their environment. Developments in historic times, including the printing press, the telephone, and the Internet, have lessened physical barriers to communication and allowed humans to interact freely on a global scale. The steady progress of military technology has brought weapons of ever-increasing destructive power, from clubs to nuclear weapons.


    Lancashire ( LANG-kə-shər, -⁠sheer; abbreviated Lancs.) is a ceremonial county in North West England. The administrative centre is Preston. The borders of the ceremonial county were created by the Local Government Act 1972 (enacted 1974) and enclose a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). However, this is only a small portion of the extent of the historic county palatine, which includes the large cities of Manchester and Liverpool as well as the Furness and Cartmel peninsulas in the Lake District, and has an area of 1,909 square miles (4,940 km2). Many of these places still identify strongly with the county, particularly in areas of Greater Manchester (such as Oldham and Bury) where Lancashire is still used as part of the postal address. The population of Lancashire in the 1971 census (before local government changes) was 5,118,405, making it the most heavily populated county in the United Kingdom at the time (other than Greater London, which had only been created in 1965). The history of Lancashire begins with its founding in the 12th century. In the Domesday Book of 1086, some of its lands were treated as part of Yorkshire. The land that lay between the Ribble and Mersey, Inter Ripam et Mersam, was included in the returns for Cheshire. When its boundaries were established, it bordered Cumberland, Westmorland, Yorkshire, and Cheshire. Lancashire emerged as a major commercial and industrial region during the Industrial Revolution. Liverpool and Manchester grew into its largest cities, with economies built around the docks and the cotton mills respectively. These cities dominated global trade and the birth of modern industrial capitalism. The county contained several mill towns and the collieries of the Lancashire Coalfield. By the 1830s, approximately 85% of all cotton manufactured worldwide was processed in Lancashire. Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Chorley, Colne, Darwen, Manchester, Nelson, Oldham, Preston, Rochdale and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time. Blackpool was a centre for tourism for the inhabitants of Lancashire's mill towns, particularly during wakes week. The historic county was subject to a significant boundary reform in 1974 which created the current ceremonial county and removed Liverpool and Manchester, and most of their surrounding conurbations to form the metropolitan and ceremonial counties of Merseyside and Greater Manchester. The detached northern part of Lancashire in the Lake District, including the Furness Peninsula and Cartmel, was merged with Cumberland and Westmorland to form Cumbria. Lancashire lost 709 square miles of land to other counties, about two fifths of its original area, although it did gain some land from the West Riding of Yorkshire. Today the ceremonial county borders Cumbria to the north, Greater Manchester and Merseyside to the south, and North and West Yorkshire to the east; with a coastline on the Irish Sea to the west. The county palatine boundaries remain the same as those of the pre-1974 county with Lancaster serving as the county town, and the Duke of Lancaster (i.e. the Queen) exercising sovereignty rights, including the appointment of lords lieutenant in Greater Manchester and Merseyside.

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/